OHA: Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Wao Kele o Puna

Comprehensive Management Plan Complete

Since the beginning of 2016, OHA has been working with its contractor, Forest Solutions Inc., and a number of subcontractors, to draft a Comprehensive Management Plan (CMP) for Wao Kele o Puna, a 25,856-acre property that OHA owns on Hawaiʻi Island.  A substantial component to the planning process has been community engagement, which was conducted through ethnohistorical interviews, a community advisory council, called the ‘Aha Kūkākūkā, and two public meeting.

On July 6, 2017, OHA held a public meeting at the Kamehameha Schools Keaʻau Campus to present the current Draft Comprehensive Management Plan.  Mahalo to David Corrigan of Big Island Video News for recording the presentation, which is available for viewing below.  OHA’s Board of Trustees have since approved the Plan and staff will begin implementing portions immediately.

Wao Kele o Puna is a 25,856-acre property that OHA owns on Hawaiʻi Island.  For OHA, the property reflects the weighted importance of ʻāina and its connection to Native Hawaiian culture and people. OHA’s aquistion of Wao Kele o Puna provides an opportunity for OHA to contribute to the protection of Hawaiʻi’s natural and cultural resources through the lens of Hawaiian culture and practice.


Ahupuaʻa of Waiakahiula, Kaʻohe
Moku of Puna
Mokupuni of Hawaiʻi
Puna district, island of Hawai‘i

Acquired: 2006
Size: 25,856 acrea
Zoning: Conservation. State forest reserve protective subzone
Cost to OHA: $300,000. Federal Forest Legacy Program paid the balance of the $3.65 million purchase price
Tenure and use: Owned fee simple
Acquisition objectives:

  • Protect natural and cultural resources
  • Protect traditional and customary rights of Native Hawaiians on the parcels


  • Forest Reserve; Puna Rainforest
  • One of few remaining tracts of lowland rainforest in the State of Hawaiʻi
  • Many benefits to surrounding lands and communities of Puna (watershed recharge, native plant seed bank for Kīlauea volcano, endangered species habitat, forest resources for gathering and cultural practices)
  • Sacred place for Native Hawaiians – part of the home of the Goddess Pele

E Nihi ka Helena i ka Uka o Puna – An Ethnohistorical Study of Wao Kele o Puna


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Statement from OHA Chair regarding Akina’s press release calling for OHA CEO removal

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OHA statement regarding release of final audit

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OHA statement regarding Auditor’s press conference

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OHA statement on unauthorized release of draft audit

Photo: Native Hawaiians marching on the 125th anniversary of the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom

ʻOnipaʻa Kākou 2018