OHA: Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Mana Lāhui Kānaka

Understanding mana is critical to understanding the contemporary Native Hawaiian identity and a key element in building stronger, healthier communities. A new book from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Mana Lāhui Kānaka, is a multidimensional study of mana: what it is, how to articulate it, and how to access and cultivate it. The 300-page volume builds on Kūkulu Hou, the vision for kanaka leadership presented by author and OHA Ka Pouhana Kamanaʻopono Crabbe, PhD.

Mana Lāhui Kānaka is the culmination of more than five years of research, drawing from literary and historical records, social science research and first-person accounts – much of which wouldn’t have been possible without the translation of Hawaiian language nūpepa, vehicles of mana in their own right.

“This book represents a framework to incorporate mana in the 21st century, and is just one tangible representation of our sophisticated identity – who we are as a living culture for the past, present and future.” – Kamanaʻopono Crabbe, PhD

 

DOWNLOADS

Download a free copy of the Mana Lāhui Kānaka Book

Download the Mana Lāhui Kānaka Executive Reportexecutive report graphic

 

Mana Digital Wallpapers

Mana Lāhui Kānaka puts forth the notion that we can uplift our communities by raising our collective mana, and vice versa. Using these beautiful digital wallpapers as cues, we encourage kānaka ʻōiwi to participate in conversations to bring forth their own ideas that manifest mana within themselves, their families, and their regions. Together we can increase the mana of our people as a lāhui kānaka.

 

August 2019

In Hawaiian culture, education played a significant role in perpetuating mana. In the quote seen below from Mary Kawena Pukui, she explains how Native Hawaiians considered strength, intelligence, skill and artistry to be reflective of mana. We then used education and training to cultivate and enhance individual talents. This excerpt from Mana Lāhui Kānaka reminds us always strive to better ourselves as kānaka. The artwork titled “ʻEke” by Marques Hanalei Marzan helps us to visualize the importance of education in cultivating mana.

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

July 2019

For Native Hawaiians, our mana depends on balancing what we know is pono with our kuleana as ʻōiwi. Much of the foundation of ancient Hawaiian spirituality and morality consisted of the mediation, negotiation and actualization of pono and kuleana in daily life, with respect to their effects on the mana of kānaka. This excerpt from Mana Lāhui Kānaka reminds us live pono and to remember our responsibilities as kānaka. The artwork titled “The Mana of Pele” by Kauʻi Chun helps us to visualize the importance of maintaining this balance to perpetuate mana.

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

June 2019

In Hawaiian culture, ‘ike and inheriting knowledge is a form of mana. Our kūpuna often recognized and selected those who had mana at a very young age and trained them to pass on knowledge and develop needed skills. This excerpt from Mana Lāhui Kānaka reminds us to remember the important role that mana plays in the passing of knowledge from generation to generation. The artwork titled “’O Māui Ka ʻIwakilomoku” by A.R. Kupihea helps us to visualize our connection to our kūpuna and kuleana to our keiki.

mana lahui kanaka wallpaper

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

 

May 2019

In celebration of life through Mother’s Day and the beginning of the summer season. Through the Hawaiian perspective there are the three piko that connects us to our past, present and future. Through mana, our three piko helps us connect to our kūpuna and carry out kuleana as ʻōiwi for generations to come. The artwork titled “He Hoʻike No Ke Ola II” by Abigail Kahilikia Romanchak helps us to visually remember that everlasting connection.

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

 

APRIL 2019

In celebration of Earth Day, we highlight Aloha ʻĀina, love for the land in the third of a series of monthly mana images. Aloha ʻāina and mālama ʻāina, caring for the land, were considered cultural mandates for all Native Hawaiians, which were inherited familial kuleana and served to guide pono actions. Loving and caring for the land and resources were believed to enhance the mana of both the kanaka and ʻāina. The artwork titled “High Tide” by Tamara Leiokanoe Moan helps us to visually remember our connection with the land.

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MARCH 2019

In Hawaiian culture, mana is the thread that connects us to our past, present, future, and most importantly, each other. This excerpt from Mana Lāhui Kānaka reminds us to remember the important role that mana plays in the foundation of our Hawaiian identity. The artwork titled “Procession Through Pohukaina” by Cory Kamehanaokalā Holt Taum and photographed by Josh Tengan helps us to visualize that mana is both dynamic and collective.

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

 

FEBRUARY 2019

In celebration of Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian Language Month), we highlight Mana ‘Ōlelo, the power of our language in the first of a series of monthly mana images. This quote reminds us to remember our history as Native Hawaiians so that the knowledge is not lost. The artwork titled “3 Spirits — Journey to Our Ancestors” by Maile Luʻuwai helps us to visually remember that connection.

Download the full resolution wallpaper:  JPG | PNG

 

IN THE NEWS

KHON2 TV News: A new book to help understand the meaning of mana
mana book launch
OHA on the Air: Radio interview with Kamanaʻopono Crabbe on Mana
Read the Ka Wai Ola Dec. 2017 cover story, Cultivating Mana Lāhui

ENGAGING COMMUNITIES

In coordination with the release of Mana Lāhui Kānaka, OHA is reaching out to larger communities to discuss mana, in person and online. Kānaka ʻōiwi are encouraged to participate and express their own ideas on how mana can be used to strengthen communities, and the lāhui at large. 

Follow us and use the hashtag #manalahui on social media in the coming year.

PLAYLIST OF MANA VIDEOS

More than 30 original videos have been created sharing community mana’o on mana. Click below or visit our Mana YouTube Playlist to watch these mana filled videos.


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