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OHA: Office of Hawaiian Affairs

OHA: Office of Hawaiian Affairs

OHA CEO statement expresses concern on State protection of iwi kupuna

January 25, 2021 Statement of OHA CEO Sylvia Hussey Concern Regarding the State Historic Preservation Division’s Administration of the Island Burial Councils and the Care, Management and Protection of Our Iwi Kupuna “On January 19, 2021, in proximity to the…

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Photo: Kamanao Crabbe

Building a sturdy foundation for the benefit of the lāhui

Prepared remarks of Kamanaʻopono M. Crabbe, Ph.D., OHA Ka Pouhana/Chief Executive Officer for delivery at the 2016 Office of Hawaiian Affairs Investiture on Dec. 9, 2016 at Central Union Church, Honolulu.  Me ke welina a ke aloha e nā kini, ka lehu, o ka mano e…

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The father of modern Hawaiian medicine and health

Statement of OHA Ka Pouhana CEO Kamana‘opono Crabbe on the passing of Dr. Kekuni Blaisdell: Dr. Blaisdell was a father of modern Hawaiian medicine and health. He was one of my mentors and pushed me to get my doctorate in…

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OHA: Office of Hawaiian Affairs

OHA seeks to include Mauna Kea ‘Ohana leadership in discussions

HONOLULU – The Office of Hawaiian Affairs has continued to urge Governor Ige and University of Hawaiʻi President Lassner to address the outstanding legal issues involved in the planned Mauna Kea thirty-meter telescope before the moratorium on construction is lifted….

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Photo: People playing Konane

The art of kōnane and mastering diplomacy

A message from Kamana‘opono M. Crabbe, Ph.D.
Ka Pouhana, Chief Executive Officer, Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Aloha mai e nā kini, nā hoa makamaka o ko Hawaiʻi pae ʻāina,

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Photo: Kamanaʻopono Crabbe

Kūkulu Hou: A vision for OHA

When the trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs were considering candidates for the recently vacated chief executive officer position, they were captivated by the metaphorical concepts of Kamana‘opono Crabbe, Ph.D., their research director. For the past two years, Crabbe had been preaching the concept of Kūkulu Hou, literally a rebuilding, but also a metaphor for building of a hale, or home, and the hard work it would take to do so.

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