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Kūkaniloko

KūkanilokoNOTICE:  MASTER PLANNING UNDERWAY

Attention: Applications for a vacant position on the Kūkaniloko Master Planning Working Group are now being accepted through 9:00 p.m. HST on July 31st, 2017.  If interested, please apply here.  Past applicants need not resubmit their application and will be automatically considered.

As of November 2016, OHA began its Master Planning process for its Wahiawā lands.  As part of Master Planning, OHA will be conducting comprehensive community engagement efforts, including the formation of a Kūkaniloko Master Planning Working Group, engaging a number of civic organizations, and hosting public community charrettes. We hope these community engagements will help advise OHA in the development of a unique, innovative, exemplary, and culturally-focused Master Plan that will harmoniously protect, preserve, and perpetuate the resources of Kūkaniloko. This includes helping identify appropriate agricultural and other uses for the site that will contribute to food security and improve the overall wellbeing of today’s and future generations.

Check this webpage for updates on the planning process, including notices of the public meetings and other opportunities to provide input.  Any input or questions can be submitted to info@oha.org.

Master Planning FAQs

  1. Where does OHA have land in Wahiawā?

In 2012, OHA acquired 511 acres of land in Wahiawā surrounding the five-acre Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones site zoned for Ag-1 with a conservation easement. The area is bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Kamananui Road, and Wilikina Drive to the east-north-east, to the west-north-west, and to the west, respectively.  A small strip of neighboring property, which is comprised of the banks of Wahiawā Reservoir (Lake Wilson) and a part of Kaukonahua Stream, boarders OHA’s property to the south. (The Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) 2015)

  1. What does the agriculture zoning mean for OHA’s Wahiawā Lands?

The purpose of the State Agricultural District is to maintain a strong agricultural economic base, to prevent unnecessary conflicts among incompatible uses, to minimize the cost of providing public improvements and service, and to manage the rate and location of development.  The purpose of the City’s agricultural AG-1 zoning district is to conserve and protect important agricultural lands for the performance of agricultural function by permitting only those uses which perpetuate the retention of these lands in the production of food, feed, forage, fiber crops and horticultural plans.  Only accessory agribusiness activities which meet the above intent shall be permitted in this district. (Permitting n.d.) (The Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) 2015)

  1. Who is the ADC?

The State of Hawai‘i Agribusiness Development Corporation (ADC) was created in 1994 to facilitate and provide direction for the transition of Hawai‘i’s agricultural industry from sugar and pineapple to diversified crops.  Information on the ADC Wahiawā Irrigation System is based on consultation with ADC and completed on January 25, 2017. (Agriculture 2008)

  1. Because the site is located near Lake Wilson, is flooding a hazard?

Based on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Community Panels 15003C0120F and 15003C0210F, the project site is located in Zone D.  The Zone D designation is used for areas where there are possible but undetermined flood hazards, as no analysis of flood hazards has been conducted.  Zone D areas are often undeveloped and sparsely populated.

  1. Why did OHA acquire these Wahiawā lands around the Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones?

OHA acquired these lands for three main reasons: (1) Protect the Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones by providing a buffer against future incompatible development in the area; (2) Explore the development of compatible agricultural uses and other programmatic initiatives; (3) Contribute to Hawai‘i’s food self-sufficiency, preservation of open space and watershed lands and overall community planning goals for central O‘ahu.

  1. What is the main goal of this Master Plan?

Aside from the three goals previously identified, OHA is looking to develop a master plan that incorporates three land use typologies. These include: Protection (Palena ‘Āina); Education (Ho‘omālamalama); Agriculture (Ho‘oulu ‘Āina).

  1. What percentage of the 511-acre lot will be allocated to each of the three land uses?

Specific acreage has not been determined nor any other programmatic details. Our hope is that the community will help us flesh out more specific land uses and footprints.

  1. Will the plans for this project disturb any of the surrounding communities?

To ensure our project is mindful of our neighbors, OHA has been in contact with the surrounding landowners to share OHA’s process and Master Plan timeline and gather feedback on their plans to find opportunities for collaboration.

  1. In addition to the preservation to the Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones, how will OHA incorporate Hawaiian cultural values?

The details of how these values will be incorporated are still to be determined, however will be guided by the goals of the land acquisition as originally approved by the Trustees.

  1. If things are still to be determined, who will be determining this?

To provide feedback throughout the process, OHA established a Kūkaniloko Master Plan Working Group in February 2017. The group is comprised of members with diverse backgrounds and expertise. The group meets monthly to advise OHA in the development of a unique, innovative, exemplary, and culturally-focused Master Plan that will harmoniously protect, preserve, and perpetuate the resources of Kūkaniloko.  This includes helping identify appropriate agricultural and other uses for the site that will contribute to food security and improve the overall wellbeing of today’s and future generations.

  1. Will the area be open to the public or only for Hawaiian beneficiaries?

The project is not exclusive to Native Hawaiians. However, OHA must honor our mandate to improve the well-being of Native Hawaiians, which is currently done through programs in the areas of ‘āina, culture, economic self-sufficiency, education, governance, and health.

  1. Is there an estimated timeline or projected end date?

The project timeline for OHA’s Wahiawā lands started in February of 2017 and will continue until July 2018 with the completion of the Master Plan draft. Pending OHA’s Board of Trustees’ approval, OHA could begin implementing portions the Master Plan as early as 2019.

  1. How can I participate?

There will be three rounds of public meetings over the course of the next year. Information and updates will be shared via Ka Wai Ola and on our website at www.oha.org/aina/kukaniloko/.


The Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones is a cultural and historical site near Wahiawā, where famous Hawaiian chiefs were born. In 2012, OHA acquired the 511-acres around the Birthing Stones site as part of a broader effort to protect and preserve Hawaiian culture by buffering the site from incompatible development and ensuring that future uses of the area are consistent with Hawaiian cultural values.

Location:
Ahupuaʻa of Kamananui
Moku of Waialua
Mokupuni of Oʻahu
Wahiawā, Oahu

Acquired: 2012
Size: 511 acres
Zoning: Agricultural, conservation easement
Cost to OHA: $3 million, part of a $25 million purchase of 1,718 acres
Tenure and use: Owned fee simple

Acquisition objectives:

  • To explore the development of compatible agricultural uses and other programmatic initiatives.
  • To contribute to Hawaiʻi’s food self-sufficiency, preservation of open space and watershed lands and overall community planning goals for central Oʻahu.
  • To protect Kūkaniloko by providing a buffer against future incompatible development in the area.

Features:
Surrounding the Kūkaniloko Birthing Stones cultural and historical site

OHA Kūkaniloko Information Sheet

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